Essays in French Literature and Culture

A peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the French Programme at the University of Western Australia ISSN No. 1835-7040

Contributors Issue 58 – 2021

Benjamin Dalton received his PhD in French in 2020 from King’s College London. Recent publications include an interview with the contemporary French philosopher Catherine Malabou entitled ‘What Should We Do With Plasticity?’ in Paragraph(2019); a book chapter on plasticity and queerness entitled ‘Cruising the Queer Forest with Alain Guiraudie: Woods, Plastics, Plasticities’ (2019); and an article in Dalhousie French Studies about plasticity in relation to the French writer Marie Darrieussecq: ‘Forms of Freedoms: Marie Darrieussecq, Catherine Malabou, and the Plasticity of Science’ (2020). 

Email : benjaminbgdalton@gmail.com

Larry Duffy is Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Kent. He is the author of Le Grand Transit Moderne: Mobility, Modernity and French Naturalist Fiction (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2005) and Flaubert, Zola and the Incorporation of Disciplinary Knowledge (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2015), and of numerous articles on Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant, Huysmans and Houellebecq, particularly in terms of these authors’ engagement with contemporary medical and scientific discourses. He is co-editor of the nineteenth-century French studies journal Dix-neuf and was co-organiser of the initial French Studies and Medical Humanities symposium at the Institute for Modern Languages Research in November 2017.

Email: W.L.Duffy@kent.ac.uk

Anna Magdalena Elsner is Assistant Professor of French Literature and Culture at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland, and Associate Member of the Centre for Humanities and Health at King’s College London. She is the author of Mourning and Creativity in Proust (2017) as well as numerous articles on twentieth-century French literature, philosophy, film and medicine. Her research crosses disciplinary boundaries and seeks to have a wider societal impact on how we think about healthcare, medicine and dying. As part of this, she has have co-founded the Swiss Network for Ethics of Care, a platform for exchange and collaboration in the field of ethics of care. She is currently working on a monograph tentatively entitled A New Death: Palliative Care and the Culture of Dying in France since 1975.

Email: anna.elsner@ibme.uzh.ch

Katie Jones is lecturer in French and Comparative Literature at the University of St Andrews. Her research interests lie in the fields of contemporary women’s writing, affect theory and medical humanities. Her first monograph, Representing Repulsion (Peter Lang, 2014) focused on representations of disgust in women’s writing in post-1990 women’s writing. Most recently, she has published on the representation of eating disorders in young adult literature, and on representations of suicide and bereavement in both fictional and autobiographical texts. She is currently working on a book-length project on suicide narratives in French. 

Email : kej5@st-andrews.ac.uk

Sarah Jones is a stipendiary lecturer at Christ Church and Merton College at the University of Oxford. She completed her DPhil from the University of Oxford in 2019 on the literary representation of the doctor-patient relationship in the nineteenth-century French novel. Her research seeks to understand the intersection between science, medical practice, and literature in the French nineteenth century. She is currently preparing her first monograph for publication and has forthcoming articles in journals such as Nineteenth-Century French Studies, on the representation of tuberculosis in Stendhal, and Revue Balzac, on the morality of medical practice.

Email: sarah.jones@chch.ox.ac.uk

Áine Larkin is Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Aberdeen. She is the author of Proust Writing Photography (Oxford: Legenda, 2011) and fifteen articles and book chapters. Recent publications include a chapter on Proust, fashion, and Parisian stairways and an article on dying and death in contemporary French life-writing. In 2019, she edited a special issue of Forum for Modern Language Studies on dance in modern and contemporary French culture. Her current book project explores the representation of illness and disability in French literary and visual culture.

Email : a.larkin@abdn.ac.uk

Enda McCaffrey is Professor of French Theory and Culture at Nottingham Trent University, UK. He is the author of a number of books and co-edited books including French Cultural Debates; The Gay Republic: Sexuality, Citizenship and Subversion in France; and The Return of Religion in France: From Democratisation to Postmetaphysics. He has recently completed special issues as guest-editor of Cultural Politics on the ‘Frames and Trajectories of Paul Virilio’ and co-editor of Esprit créateur on ‘French Thanatology’. Professor McCaffrey is currently engaged in a number of projects relating to French queer cinema, ecopoetics and the Medical Humanities.

Email : enda.mccaffrey@ntu.ac.uk

Aina Marti-Balcells is an Early Career researcher. She received her PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Kent. Her recent publications include “Ways of Building, Ways of Living: Viollet-Le-Duc’s Entretiens sur l’architecture and Zola’s Pot-Bouille” (Australian Journal of French Studies, 2019, 57:3) and “Home in Colette’s Claudine: A Contemporary Discussion on Non-Normative Dwellings” (Bloomsbury, 2021). She is currently completing her first monograph on the ways in which late nineteenth-century literature imagined the impact of new domestic architecture on the sexual imaginary, including notions of sexual normality and perversity.

Email: ainamarti894@gmail.com

Silvia Rossi holds a PhD in Italian Languages and Literatures (Univ. Paris Ouest Nanterre, 2016). Her research focuses on the narrative of the experience of illness in the field of cancer, narrative medicine and the role of narration as part of the training of health professionals. Dr Rossi is currently A.T.E.R. (Temporary Assistant Professor) at the School of Public Health, EA 4360 – APEMAC (Adaptation, mesure et évaluation en santé. Approches interdisciplinaires), Faculty of Medicine, University of Lorraine. Her latest book is Écrire le cancer – De l’expérience de maladie à l’autopathographie (Paris: Téraèdre, 2019).

Email : silviarossi1980@hotmail.com

Alison Williams is an Associate Professor of French at Swansea University. She has published on medieval and Renaissance literature, including articles and book chapters on Le Roman de RenartFouke le FitzWaryn, and Rabelais, and a monograph on tricksters and pranksters in French and German pre-modern literature (Amsterdam: Brill/Rodopi, 2000). She has a particular interest in the interdisciplinary Medical Humanities and has presented several conference papers on the connection of medieval and Renaissance literature to the field, including papers on Marie de France and Rabelais. 

Email: a.j.williams@swansea.ac.uk

Steven Wilson is Senior Lecturer in French Studies at Queen’s University Belfast. His research is situated at the interface of French Studies and the Medical Humanities and is concerned with the ways in which modern French literature, from the nineteenth century to the present, contributes to global understandings and linguistic articulations of illness, disease, pain, medical practice and dying/death. He has edited several special journal issues on these themes, including French Autopathography, French Thanatology and The Care (Re)Turn in French and Francophone Studies, and is the author of The Language of Disease: Writing Syphilis in Nineteenth-Century France (Oxford: Legenda, 2020).

Email: steven.wilson@qub.ac.uk

Kit Yee Wong is an Associate Research Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London, UK. Her PhD thesis, awarded in 2018, is on the subject of myth in Émile Zola’s Rougon-Macquart novels. In 2019, she organised the symposium ‘The Pathological Body from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Present: European Literary and Cultural Perspectives’ (@pathbodylit), and the journal special issue will be published in 2021. She is also co-organiser of the annual Migrating Texts Modern Languages workshops (@migratingtexts) at the IMLR in London, UK, established in 2014. She is working towards a monograph based on her PhD thesis.

Email:  k.wong@bbk.ac.uk